Micro controller Hacking coming soon

I have been hacking on my costume, and as such, have not gotten around to posting the code and pictures of the project that I am currently working on. As soon as Halloween roles by, I should be able to get that up here. Hopefully, you will enjoy the costume and the work that I have done on getting the goggles up and running. 

Normally, I would have tried to add it in chunks, but I have been learning how to solder, learning how to code this thing, and have been trying to get the rest of my costume configured. 

That being said, I am working on it. Oh, and for work I have been learning all the new nuances to python 3.6. Almost like learning another language from what python used to be. So, hold out for another few days, and I will share my code and some pics of the work as I have learned how to solder, and how to write a bit of code for an adafruit neopixel.

Configuring AWSCLI and Python on Windows

Trying and doing stuff on a Windows 10 machine has become a rather interesting experiment. It started as a place to be able to play video games and have access to a few programs that are not easily available on Linux, to a test of seeing if I could now do all the things on Windows 10 that I could do on Linux.

Turns out, I wanted to test out the Cloud Directory service from AWS. I figured the 2 easiest ways to do this would be via the AWS CLI and Python. It did not occur to me that I had neither of these installed until I opened up Cmder.exe and typed

aws
and then
python
and both came back with the not found.

Wait, what? Where are my programs!

So, now I need to install and configure both of these. The test is to see how easy or difficult it is to get this setup on this Windows machine. Quick list of the normal steps that I take to install the AWS CLI on most any Linux machine.

  1. Install Python
  2. Configure a virtual environment to hold my cli tools
  3. Use pip to install aws cli
  4. Configure aws cli
  5. Test that it all works

The first step in setting all of this up is to get Python installed on your machine. The AWS cli is based on Python, and as such you need to have python installed in order to use it. Now, there are some that will install the AWS cli to the root of the machine, and use the system’s globally installed Python. Due to having worked on multiple versions of Python at the same time, and projects that use different libraries, I almost always setup an Virtual Environment to run my Python programs and other sundry programs from. This way, I don’t cross contaminate my streams, and have a clearly defined idea about which versions I am using on different projects.

Installing Python

This is a relatively straightforward task. Click on the Python installer that suits your needs, download it, and follow the install prompts. I chose Python 3.6.7 because it is the version that I am already using when running some Lambda programs in AWS, and because there are some new changes in 3.7 that have broken a few other libraries. On big one is ‘async’ and ‘await’ now becoming keywords. Follow the prompts to install Python and the restart your favorite command line tool. I run bash via git, and use cmder.exe as my shell program.

Once you have it installed you should be able to run the following to verify that you have install python on your workspace. python --version This should output ‘Python 3.6.7’ or whichever version of  Python that you installed.

Setting up Virtual Environment and AWS CLI

The next part is to install the virutal environment and to then use that to install the aws cli. This should be able to be done with just a few commands, and then you should be up and running.  First we run python and install the virtual environment. Then we activate the environment and install the AWS cli. It is just a few simple commands, and you should then be up and running.

c:\ericv\dev\python -m venv p367
c:\ericv\dev\> p367\Scripts\activate.bat
(p367) c:\ericv\dev\> pip install awscli
(p367) c:\ericv\dev\> aws help

And bamm! you are done. Now, there is always configuring aws to use params, but that is another issue. But, it took me longer to write this up, than it took me to do the install.  That in of itself is a good thing to know. Now, the question is if I will run into any more problems. But, so far so good.


DevOps Consultant vs DevOps Engineer

What is the difference between a DevOps Consultant and a DevOps Engineer? This question recently came up and I wanted to add my thoughts on the topic.

First, lets address the fact that consultants are almost always hired to work on a specific project or to address a specific issue the company is facing. As such, the role of a consultant will probably always be different than that of a regular employee. The regular employee has to deal with the mundane job of ensuring the lights are on, email, ongoing projects, operations, regular development tasks. The list goes on.

In a lot of ways, consultants are free from this type of scenario, and can focus on the one task or 5 tasks at hand. As such, sometimes consultants can get more done than a regular employee that has other responsibilities. Also, and because they are seen as experts in their areas, sometimes, the views of consultants are more highly valued or taken to heart by upper management.

With that out of the way. There is a difference. The article does stress the teaching, part. I am not sure that it really stresses the transformation part as much. A devops consultant, if they are good, will pair up with people at the company and help teach how devops works, and how to successfully transform a company and a group. They are brought in to look at a situation with fresh eyes, and potentially help shift the entire way that a group is doing things.

This does not mean that there is really a difference in skill sets between a devops engineer and a consultant. But if there is one, I would say it is around teaching and the ability to focus. There is also the other part, and that is the business acumen that consultants learn because they tend to have to deal with people from all levels of the company.

On the other hand, consultants, unless they are on a long assignment, may find that while they are making high level changes, do not always have the chance to get their hands dirty. This depends on the company they are working with, and what the job entails. So, a devops engineer, can end up having more time developing solution, whether it be configuring CICD, infrastructure as code, automating application deployments, automating error responses. Because of this, consultants sometimes have to dive deep on side projects to ensure that their skills are staying up to date with what is currently going on. Tongue in cheek, but sometimes it is just the opposite, and they are scrambling to learn the tool that the customer is using so they can help with that project.

The other reason people bring in consultants is because there could be a skills gap. Company A, realized that they are not moving fast enough and need to change. They go to the IT guys and that group says, “Not my job.” In that case, they bring in consultants because it is quicker to hire consultants than it is to hire full time people. And, unless you are just going to run your company with consultants, you should be bringing on full time people to learn from them or to be filling those roles as the consultants leave.

A bit long winded, but I hope it helps. Ping me if you have any other questions. I have been on both sides of the fence.

Oh. and travel. Consultants normally have to travel.

Time to Hack On an Adafruit Trinket

I don’t know much about microcontrollers. Somewhere along the lines, I never learned about them, how they work, or how to wire them together and use them. Up until a few years ago, I did not even know what a bread board was. Heck, I still do not even really know how they work, but I am going to learn.  And to that ends, I am starting with an Adafruit Trinket.

Let me start by saying that I have hooked up an arduino microcontroller, and turned a light off and on, but that was the extent of it. Without having some other sensors I did not see the point. As a result, it ended up collecting dust on a shelf for the past few years. I did have some ideas of some projects that I wanted to do, but I had no idea where to start, or what tools I would need.

Those are all pretty much excuses. In the end, I never took the time to learn the various parts of electronics. Now, I plan on diving into the world of microcontrollers and see what I can create, and if I have any desire to continue on with it. Could be that I finish a single project and decide that there is nothing else I would like to build or tinker with. That is one of the fun things about trying out new projects and activities, you can find what you enjoy and what you do not.

As to how I am going to start, that is simple. I picked up a project to do. Using some items that I already own, I am going to start learning how to program an Adafruit Trinket. Along with this, I got a couple of the light rings that Adafruit also sells. One of my main issues with arduino, is the cost. I don’t want to have to dish out $40 for just the board for every project that I plan on working on. 

So, now it is time to go play, and to learn. At least on this topic. But, it is good not to do the same thing all the time, and to keep things interesting. I will add updates as I continue to work on my project, and maybe include the final product.